PRAYERS OF THE FAITHFUL

WEEK OF SEPT. 15, 2019

Response to each petition: Receive our prayer, O Lord.

  • For the church. May we find and welcome those who are lost or estranged from religion or community, that they may return to God’s loving embrace.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O Lord.

  • May we have the grace to forgive those who have injured us, and together, may we return to God’s loving embrace.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O Lord.

  • For runaway and missing children. For orphans, or family members who are alienated or separated by distance. For those who live alone by choice or circumstance. May they know God’s care and love.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O Lord.

  • For all who died in the 9/11 attacks and for all who mourn or still suffer from those events. May God’s love shepherd the deceased into life eternal. And may those affected find compassion and healing.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O Lord.

  • We pray for our parish religious education program and for blessings upon our religion teachers and upon our staff. May they be unified in purpose and care for each other, and may our parish children grow in grace and in faith.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O Lord.

  • For all in need of our prayer. May we find ways to establish peace and justice for all who are threatened by poverty, violence or terrorism. And for the intentions we hold in our silence …

We ask: Receive our prayer, O Lord.

Call to worship

God’s love and mercy always is there for us. Like the shepherd who finds his lost sheep, the poor woman who finds her lost coin, and the generous father who welcomes his lost son, God always welcomes us back with an open heart.

  • To the point: What the shepherd, the woman and the father all have in common is having lost something dear to them. When they find what they have lost, they rejoice extravagantly. In the parable of the prodigal son, he is found because he chooses to return to his father’s house: he chooses life. By contrast, the older son — in his anger, resentment and jealousy — truly is the one who is lost because he refuses to rejoice in his father’s mercy and goodness: he chooses death. The extravagant mercy and goodness of our divine Father urges us to choose life over death.
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 15: 1-32)  to the first reading: Both readings describe the mercy God extends to sinners, whether the sin is idolatry (first reading); dissolute living (younger son); or anger, resentment and jealousy (older son). Such divine mercy begets new life.
  • To experience: Many parents anguish as they watch a son or daughter go astray in life. They will do anything to help their children come to their senses and turn their life around. Parents only want life for their children, although sometimes children seem to choose death for themselves.
Reflection

The over-the-top reactions of the shepherd, the woman and the forgiving father are intended to assure sinners that God is crazy in love over each individual human being and rejoices exuberantly over finding one that had been lost.  

WEEK OF SEPT. 8, 2019

Response to each petition: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For wisdom in the church and in government. Give us insight that we may lay aside all selfishness and divisions, that we may be of service to the poor and and seek to provide safety for immigrants and refugees.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For the grace to set priorities correctly. Open us to renounce all those obstacles, beliefs and practices that prevent us from being true disciples.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For all who suffer. For the addicted, for people afflicted with disease, for prisoners, for victims of human trafficking, for people who struggle through rehabilitation and treatments. We remember those devastated by hurricane Dorian. Give them strength, encouragement and pathways toward healing.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For people in ministry who are challenged. By those faith is closed and whose lives are torn. For any who suffer injustice because of faith. For all who struggle in any way with the church. Give them insight, perseverance and hope.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For the blessings of the end of summer. For students and teachers and all who begin new endeavors in autumn. We pray for our new bishop and the challenges he meets daily. We pray for the needs of our parish community, and for those experiencing sickness, dying or grief. Hear all the prayers we hold in silence …

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

Call to worship

Jesus requires radical discipleship. Following Jesus means giving up everything, taking calculated risks and being ready to embrace suffering.

  • To the point: Discipleship requires renunciation and calculation. Those who wish to follow Jesus must renounce everyone and everything that gets in the way of a single-minded response to Jesus’ invitation to be his disciple. At the same time, disciples are not naively to follow Jesus. They must calculate and consent to the cost — the price is giving their all, even their own life. The One who calls gives disciples in return something beyond calculation — fullness of new life.
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 14: 25-33) to the first reading: Wisdom reminds us “the deliberations of mortals are timid.” Jesus, however, challenges us to be anything but timid. With bold calculation and conviction we are to embrace the cross. This is the way of discipleship.
  • To experience: We take much time and care over major decisions — buying a house, marrying, having children, taking a new job. Nevertheless, each of these brings surprises and new challenges, not initially considered. The same is true for committed discipleship — even after we make the informed decision to follow Jesus, there are still many surprises on the road of discipleship.
Reflection

Jesus bluntly challenges the crowd to take up the demands of discipleship with eyes wide open. Discipleship demands radical and calculated choices.

The king waging war shows how shrewd calculations can bring fullness. What king would not rather send a peace delegation knowing that his army is so drastically outnumbered?

Likewise, we must abandon our own wishes and whatever holds us captive. Jesus says that even our loved ones should not keep us from full discipleship. Paul’s abandons his slave and names him as a brother.

Jesus is not telling us to stop loving our family; but no relationships should ever possess us. We are not to be prisoners to our desires, goals, wealth or relationships. Free of these things, we can follow Jesus with single-minded hearts such as the tower builders of the Gospel who begin with the proper foundations.

WEEK OF SEPT. 1, 2019

Response to each petition: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For greater humility in the church and in government. May we grow in awareness that whatever we accomplish is the result of God’s love and grace.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For greater hospitality in our world. May all people experience welcome in new countries, neighborhoods, places of worship, in their jobs and in social circles.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For deeper intimacy with God and with humanity. May those who are sick, aged, handicapped, addicted or challenged in any way receive our tender care, attention and love.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For all who are declining mentally or who have dementia. May God protect them from harm and give strength and wisdom and for those who care for them.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For all who labor. Bless their work and their rest. And for the unemployed and under-employed. Give them hope, courage and opportunity.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For the gift of peace. May God inspire all who are working to end war, prejudice, terrorism and violence between nations, religious and ethnic groups.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For the particular needs of our parish community. For those returning to school, for those travelling this weekend, for the grieving, and all who we remember in silence …

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

Prayer for Labor Day

O God, source of all wisdom and purpose, and the blessing of those who labor; be with us in our work to guide and govern our world. Give all people work that enhances human dignity and bonds us to one another. Give us pride in our work, a fair return for our labor and joy in knowing that our work finds its source in you. Through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Call to worship

Sincere humility helps us to recognize our true worth and the deep value of all others, especially the poor, those crippled by society, and those who are outcast by judgment. We sit together with them at the banquet of the Lord

  • To the point: In this Gospel Jesus challenges guests and host at a dinner. Jesus calls the guests to let go of seeking places of honor and to choose seats that lead to being called “to a higher position.” Jesus calls the host to invite as his guests those who have only themselves to give in return, for which the host will be repaid at the “resurrection of the righteous.”
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 14: 1, 7-14) to the first reading: Humility is in part, knowing one’s strengths and weaknesses (first reading) and one’s place (Gospel). But it is more. Humility is the virtue by which we acknowledge our status before God: We are “the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind” who come to God’s table because of God’s invitation and generosity.
  • To experience: Jesus in this Gospel is not negating meals with family and friends. He is teaching us that our generosity must extend beyond our immediate circle to include everyone — especially those in need.
Reflection

Today’s scripture highlights an irony of inverted expectations. Sirach says that love is in giving rather than receiving, greatness in humility, and wisdom comes to the listener, not the speaker. The psalm reveals God as the dwelling of the homeless, the liberty of prisoners, a refreshing rain for dry hearts. Hebrews says that while we think God is unapproachable as a high mountain, all-consuming as a raging furnace, impenetrable as a dark abyss — God really is a loving parent whose dwelling place is the festive, healing, and life-giving Zion. Knowing that parties of his time were for the rich, Jesus proclaimed that it better to invite the unwanted poor and discarded to our parties, and to be happy when they could not repay us since repayment comes in heaven. Mary proclaimed, “God routs the proud, dethrones the prince and exalts the lowly.” Her lowly soul magnified God; our own diminishment reveals God’s greatness.

WEEK OF AUG. 25, 2019

Response to each petition: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For the church. Shape us into courageous disciples filled with your Spirit, opening our hearts to all people and always willing to grow in our faith.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For all who face trials or difficult choices. May government leaders find ways to work together so that all people may have better lives, especially those who have struggled so long to find freedom, integrity and wholeness.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For the grace to enter through the narrow gate. May your Spirit inspire us to live with forgiveness, compassion and openness?

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For our new bishop. Bless him as he faces the challenges of our diocese. May he bring us healing and new energy.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For places in our world where there is tension. For immigrants separated from their families. Open our hearts, banish our fears, help us to establish peace for all people.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For our beloved sick, dying and grieving. And for the intentions we hold in our silence …

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

Call to worship

Jesus tells us today that the gate to salvation is narrow. We close the gate to salvation ourselves when we are judgmental and when we are comfortable and complacent in our spiritual growth.

  • To the point: Entering the narrow gate to salvation is not guaranteed by privilege or tradition, but guaranteed by openness to the in-breaking of the Messiah. The gate is narrow because the way is difficult — journeying with Jesus leads to Jerusalem and the cross. The strength needed to persist on this journey comes from reclining “at table in the kingdom of God.” It comes from eating and drinking the messianic Food with the Messiah.
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 13: 22-30) to the first reading: Isaiah prophesies that salvation is offered to all peoples (“from all the nations”). The gospel makes clear a condition for salvation: those who desire salvation must journey with Jesus to Jerusalem and accept all this entails.
  • To experience: Our society tends to declare “numero uno!” We tend to want to be first, to find things easy, to have everything handed to us on a silver platter. This gospel says exactly the opposite. We are not first — Christ is. Things will not be easy — the road to salvation is narrow, difficult, demanding. Everything will not be handed to us. Rather, we are asked to hand ourselves over.
Reflection

The question to Jesus should have been, “Who will be saved?” These readings reinforce salvation’s wide reach to all people, gathered by God’s hand. But it is not enough. Being saved means deciding to “enter through the narrow gate,” which is Jesus himself. Those who choose to do so walk faithfully with Jesus toward Jerusalem’s self-denial and self-surrender. It is not enough to be in Jesus’ company, or to have eaten with him. Salvation is for the disciple who follows closely and who follows through.

WEEK OF AUG. 18, 2019

Response to each petition: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • May the church find stronger ways to influence the world; that greed, selfishness, divisions and wars will end; that all nations may be ignited by stronger faith, and filled with deeper respect for humanity.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For all Christians in our own nation. May we find unity in times of political division. That faithfulness may mark our values, choices and thinking. May we come together as people of God.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For our relationships that need healing within families, among friends and with co-workers. May we be able to open inroads of kindness and gentleness.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For those who are mistreated in any way. Those abandoned or shunned by society, those suffering in prisons or other institutions, those victimized by human trafficking or immigration. May they find freedom, safety and peace.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For young people heading off to college, particularly those going away for the first time. May God guide them to make wise decisions and to develop good friendships.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For what we ask in silence … We pray for blessings on our beloved sick, dying and grieving …

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

Call to worship

Staying faithful to Jesus will bring division among people and even within families. We must let our baptism empower us with the fire of God’s Spirit so that our choices will be clear and loving.

  • To the point: In today’s Gospel, fire is an image referring to divine judgment. Jesus clearly states that he has come to judge the people. His own faithfulness to this task led to his anguish and ultimately to his passion and death. So will we, his faithful disciples be treated. Jesus’ intent is not primarily to condemn people, but to challenge them to right living according to the covenant established with God. This is our intent.
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 12:49-53) to the first reading: Jeremiah’s preaching divided the city and incited such opposition that people sought his death. Standing in this prophetic tradition, Jesus, too, preaches a word which divides families and leads ultimately to his death.
  • To experience: None of us seeks or desires division and strife, especially among those whom we cherish most. Sometimes, however, the choice is so clear and the values are so important, that we accept division and strife as a consequence of our choice.
Reflection

The fire of Christ must burn brightly and intensely. Christ’s fire must blaze in us. From Teilhard de Chardin: “Someday, after mastering the winds, the waves, the tides and gravity, we shall harness for God the energies of love. And then, for the second time in the history of the world, man will have discovered fire.”

WEEK OF AUG. 11, 2019

Response to each petition: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For the church. May we believe that faith will guide us through any turmoil. May we trust in God’s will and direction for our lives.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For those who have lost faith. May God’s Spirit renew their hearts and open them to pathways of discovery.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For patience and trust to all who wait. For those expecting children, for families who wait for the return of loved one, for anyone waiting for reconciliation with a friend or family member, for immigrants seeking welcome and a new life.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For a deeper awareness of God’s presence in our lives. May we learn to live each day as faithful disciples, trusting in God’s promises and serving others.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For the needs we place in God’s heart during this time of silence …

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

Call to worship

In today’s Gospel, Jesus reminds us that being blessed means that we must be prepared and vigilant, always ready to meet our Master.

  • To the point: What, really, does the Father give us? What is the treasure that is to claim our hearts? The “inexhaustible treasure in heaven” the Father gives us is the Son (the Master). Our hearts must lie with the Son, for he is our Treasure. Those servants who are formed by this treasure abide by the Son’s expectations and seek to carry them out. Faithful servants do as the Son would  do — their actions follow their heart.
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 12: 32-48) to the first reading: The “holy children of the good” were putting God’s plan into effect just as the “faithful and prudent steward” in the Gospel was putting into effect the Master’s will.
  • To experience: There are many treasures found in this life — for example, family, home, community, friendship, integrity. Good as these are, they are nonetheless exhaustible. What the Father offers us is an inexhaustible treasure: the fullness of the life of the risen Lord.
Reflection

Faith is confident assurance concerning what we hope for seeing in trust. Faithful people have conviction about things unseen. So it was with Abraham and Sarah who believed they would give birth in old age, with Noah on his improbable ark, with Moses abandoned as a child against improbable odds. Faith felled the walls of Jericho and fed the hungry with manna. These heroes of faith did not live to see what was promised; though faith eases confusion, dulls pain and redeems time, it never brings final clarity. Faith-filled people wait with vigilance, like the blessed servant doing his master’s will, even in the master absence. Being prepared for the master’s arrival is not a matter of calculating time; it is about faithfulness. In the master’s absence, the faithful servant acts as the master himself — caring for others, giving them all they need. Doing the master’s will means becoming the master in his absence. This is true discipleship.

WEEK OF AUG. 4, 2019

Response to each petition: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For a deeper commitment to the teachings of our faith. May we not allow ourselves to be seduced by the illusions of wealth, fame, power or control.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • Sustain all who bear the burdens of hunger and poverty. Help us find ways and opportunities to be more generous in our sharing;

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For all who struggle with finances and employment. Guide their decisions and open new pathways for them.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • Touch the hearts of all who are depressed, alone or addicted. May they know the grace and beauty that you unfold for us with each new day.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For an end to prejudice, judgment, terrorism and violence. Inspire all people to be peacemakers so that we may courageously end divisions in the human family and promote reconciliation.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For the needs we hold in silence, and especially for our beloved sick, dying and grieving …

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

Call to worship

In today’s gospel, Jesus tells the story of a rich man who deeply cares about his earthly possessions. Today we acknowledge and celebrate the treasures we have stored in heaven.

  • To the point: The rich man in today’s Gospel parable judges that he has stored up enough possessions to guarantee a good life without worries — so he thinks. Any reliance on wealth and possessions, however, is pure folly —worldly possessions and this life are fleeting. What truly matters is the inheritance that only God can give: the fullness of eternal life. What “matters to God” is spending our life dispossessing ourselves of anything which hinders us from growing into the fullness of life.
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 12: 13-21) to the first reading: The first reading describes in greater detail the misfortune that befalls the rich man in the Gospel parable. Laboring for wealth and possessions is not only foolish, but results in sorrow, grief, and anxiety.
  • To experience: We naturally and responsibly store up wealth to take care of our future. There is nothing wrong with this kind of planning. The issue of the gospel is that we must look beyond the wealth, guard against sheer greed, and keep our eye turned toward what “matters to God.”
Reflection

Today’s scriptures remind us of the brevity of life and the dangers of self-containment. Our possessions, knowledge, and work avail us nothing. When we die, all we have could be easily given to another who does not deserve it at all.  The self- satisfied man who builds bigger storehouses for the fruits of his labor will die before he enjoys any of it. He symbolizes the self-contained person delighting in his possessions, proud of his accomplishments – the hoarder set up for an easy life. He has lost contact with the fragility of his own life; his possessions own him. He has shared little. Today’s readings warn us about the illusions that beset us, the sounds of the sirens that lure us. Ours is a plain and crucial choice. Who will be our God? Before what powers will we fall on our knees?  Our real inheritance lies in the fullness of life that God wishes to give us. We lose sight of that when worries, obsessions, and possessions obstruct our view.

WEEK OF JULY 28, 2019

Response to each petition: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For the church. May we be persistent in our prayer, seeking growth in our relationship with God and with our brothers and sisters in every land.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For the world and for those in need of daily bread. Provide new opportunities for them. Touch the hearts of those who have abundance to share more freely.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For a deep spiritual renewal in our lives. Help us discover new directions and new energy. May truth and integrity set higher standards for ethics in our lives.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • Provide safety for all who travel and guidance to those who are away from home. May all countries treat immigrants humanely. Bless those serving in the military or in the missions.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For the needs we offer in silence … for our beloved sick, dying and grieving ….

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

Call to worship

As Jesus teaches his followers how to pray, He assures them that God answers their prayers. We need to trust God’s faithfulness always and to continue praying steadfastly, honestly and humbly.

  • To the point: Jesus instills confidence in his disciples that they will receive from God that for which they pray. He teaches them (and us) to pray for daily needs: the food we need to live, the forgiveness we need to grow in our relationships, the protection we need to remain faithful. Because of what we already have received (our daily needs), we are certain that God will give even more to those who ask: the Holy Spirit, a share in the plenitude of God’s very Life. Such a gift! Why would we not ask?
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 11:1-13) to the first reading: Abraham directly, confidently, persistently and courageously petitions God to spare the people of Sodom and Gomorrah. In the Gospel Jesus teaches us to pray with the same directness, confidence, persistence and courage.
  • To experience: Nothing breeds confidence like success. This also is true when we turn to God in prayer. Although not always in the way we expect, God always answers our prayer.

WEEK OF JULY 21, 2019

Response to each petition: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For the church and for the world. May we offer hospitality, welcome and acceptance to all people, and especially to immigrants and refugees who seek safety and opportunity for their families.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For openness to the great gift of life. May parents and relatives joyfully welcome and care deeply for each child in their family and extended family. May we encourage all children to know how deeply they are loved by God.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For those who are too busy with work and who neglect the joy of living. May they free themselves to recognize and celebrate the relationships that bring them life.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For blessing on our parish community. May this weekend of festivity be filled with love and joy and be a sign of our hospitality and welcome to many.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For our beloved sick and dying, and in grateful memory of our ancestors who built and sustained our parish community. May their dedication inspire us to build our future.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For what we place before God in our silence ..

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

Call to worship

Visits, conversations and hospitality are deep within the loving nature of God. This weekend, as we celebrate our own faith community, the readings proclaim the holiness of hospitality and welcome.

  • To the point: Martha’s generous hospitality is marred by her upbraiding Jesus and complaining to him about Mary. Rather than being truly hospitable, she is “anxious and worried” only about accomplishing a task. Her welcome shifts away from Jesus to herself. Busy about herself, she misses the “better part” — centering on Jesus. The “better part” is to be undividedly present to the person of Jesus. Even when serving.
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 10:38-42) to the first reading: Abraham exhibited true hospitality. All of his efforts and busyness were directed toward the presence of his guests and their comfort and needs. This is what Martha in the gospel failed to do: keep persons at the heart of hospitality.
  • To experience: How uncomfortable we feel when our presence takes second place in the attention of a host who is busy about the details of our being there. On the other hand, how welcome we feel when we are the host’s center of concern and attention.

WEEK OF JULY 14, 2019

Response to each petition: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • May we be a Church of compassion and insight, Finding ways to alleviate suffering and moving beyond boundaries to respond with genuine love.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • May victims of crime and prejudice find healing. May immigrants be welcomed and treated with care. May there be reconciliation and peace wherever there is division, suffering or violence.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For the addicted, the sick, the dying and the grieving. May they know tenderness and love.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For all who care for others in need. For people who work in outreach ministries to prisoners or to the homebound. Renew and strengthen their work.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For our own community. May this Boilermaker weekend be a time of safety and refreshment for all.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For the prayers and intentions that we offer in silence …

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

Call to worship

The law is within our hearts. It tells us to love mercifully and generously, to open our hearts like Good Samaritans — welcoming, comforting, using our gifts to help those who are in need.

  • To the point: What is written in the law?” Jesus asks the “scholar of the law.” Many would tend to answer by citing the Ten Commandments or civil law. But the lawyer in the Gospel answered correctly when he named love as the law. Law is not about keeping rules, but about loving others. Eternal life is not inherited by keeping laws, but by caring for others and treating them with mercy. The law of love teaches us that love is nothing less than the unconditional gift of self.
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 10:25-37) to the first reading: The  law is not “mysterious and remote” but is “already in (our) mouths  and in (our) hearts.” We “have only to carry it out” and, as the Gospel reminds us, it bears the human face of our neighbor in need.
  • To experience: As a framework to guide human behavior, law is good and necessary. When rearing children, we teach them to go beyond mere observance of laws’ external demands to grasping the laws’ deeper intent: building a community of care, respect, mercy — love.

WEEK OF JULY 7, 2019

Response to each petition: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For the church. Show us how to be welcoming and loving joyful witnesses of the gospel.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For our world. Provide hope for all who struggle with crime, poverty, terrorism and injustice. Open our hearts to those seeking refuge and peace.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For missionaries and all called to lay ministry. Renew their spirits. Give them courage and support for their work.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For our country. We pray for healing from all that divides us. May we abandon our fears and prejudices, envision the power of our unity and work together for the common good.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For those in special need. Tenderly hold the sick and the dying, all who are addicted, alone or grieving.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For our personal intentions that we hold in silence …

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

Call to worship

Jesus sends out the 72 disciples into the world warning them about rejection a nd promising them that their names are written in heaven.

  • To the point: Jesus sends the disciples out to plant the seed of the Good News and harvest its fruit of peace and the in-breaking of the kingdom of God. The “kingdom of God is at hand” because wherever disciples are present and received, God is present and received. Despite the disciples facing “wolves” and sometimes being rejected, their labor will bear fruit for it is God’s power that works through them. For this divine power and presence the disciples — and we — rejoice.
  • Connecting the gospel (Luke 10: 1-12) to the first reading: Isaiah’s vision uses different images to describe the same reality presented in the gospel. The fruit of the disciples’ labors (peace, healing and God’s kingdom at hand) are described in Isaiah as comfort, abundance, and prosperity. Both readings envision God’s power and presence now and a future when our “heart(s) shall rejoice.”
  • To experience: Many people live in fear of a future marked by destruction and chaos; they have abandoned hope. These readings invite us to hope in the future God has in store for us- one of blessing and joy. At the same time, because God’s kingdom is already at hand, we live in this blessing and joy now. God has richly blessed our nation. Isaiah and Jesus remind us that God’s kingdom does not measure abundance by possessions or resources- but by the quality of our relationships. We pray for healing of the divisions within our nation.

WEEK OF JUNE 30, 2019

Response to each petition: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For the church. May we become stronger disciples of Christ willing to confront all types of injustice so to create pathways toward peace.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For our world. May tensions and conflicts end so that nations may use their resources to cure disease and alleviate poverty and hunger.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For high school graduates and for all who are making life decisions. May they have the courage to choose pathways that are life-giving and holy.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • May summer bring us peace and refreshment. Time to nourish our spiritual lives and time for reflection and discernment.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For our beloved sick, dying and grieving. For those who are prisoners of addiction. And for those who seek welcome in new lands.

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For the needs we hold in our silence …

We ask: Lord, receive our prayer.

Call to worship

As Jesus journeys to Jerusalem, he and his disciples encounter a number of conflicts. There always are obstacles in life’s journey. When we face them with faith our convictions are strengthened.

  • To the point: As Jesus “resolutely determine(s) to journey to Jerusalem,” he encounters a number of conflicts. Jesus is not welcome in a Samaritan village, he rebukes disciples who want to take revenge, he predicts the lack of comfort and security for his followers and he chides those who have excuses for not immediately following him. These conflicts arise because the journey to Jerusalem entails death — dying to self in facing this journey’s conflicts and death at this journey’s end. Nevertheless, the journey must be made — by Jesus, by his disciples, by us — because this is the only journey that leads to life.
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 9:51-62) to the first reading: Just as the continuation of Elijah’s prophetic mission was assured by the call of Elisha, so is the continuation of Jesus’ saving mission assured by the call of disciples who follow him on his journey through death to life.
  • To experience: Often, opposition and conflict enable us to clarify our goals, strengthen our conviction and increase our courage in pursuit of a vision. So it is with the inevitable conflicts that arise when we follow Jesus on the journey through dying to new life.

WEEK OF JUNE 23, 2019

Response to each petition: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For the church. Guide us to live as a Eucharistic people, generously giving and sharing ourselves so that all may have life.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For our pastor, Father Jim, all priests, and all who exercise priestly ministry. Renew their vision and strengthen them. Draw them closer to your people.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For the hungry and the poor of our world. For immigrants seeking refuge, safety and peace. Open our hearts to find ways to sustain their lives and to work for justice.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For the gift of peace in our world. Heal our divisions. Enlighten our dialogue to encourage unity to end selfishness, greed, prejudice and all forms of violence.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • Bring comfort and healing to those who suffer through illness, addiction and grief. Bring understanding and peace to the dying, and hear the needs we hold in silence …

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

Call to worship

Today we celebrate the Feast of the Body and Blood of Christ. Today’s Gospel reminds Christians that no matter how much we have, we must be willing to share it all.

  • To the point: Healing, nourishment, satisfaction and abundance are all signs of the presence of God’s kingdom. Jesus’ actions in this gospel, however, reveal an even more telling sign. By taking, blessing, breaking and giving the bread and fish, he foreshadows the total gift of his very self — on the cross, in the Eucharist. The fullest presence of the kingdom of God is revealed by the total gift of self. When we receive Jesus’ gift of self in the Eucharist and choose to be transformed into being that same gift for others, we are the visible presence of the kingdom of God. The kingdom of God comes to fulfillment in every act of total self-giving.
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 9: 11-17) to the second reading: The focus of this solemnity is not limited to our eating and drinking the Eucharistic elements, but leads to our living the total self-giving of Christ: “For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the death of the Lord until he comes.”
  • To experience: Total self-giving seems beyond human capability. Only little by little do we grow in our capacity to give ourselves as Jesus did. The Eucharist nourishes and encourages us as we more and more in our daily lives choose self-giving.
Feast of the Body and Blood of Christ

This solemn feast began in 1247 as a response to attacks on the real presence of Christ in the sacrament. By the 14th century, it included a procession with the sacrament after Mass that became a petition for good weather with the monstrance offered at four stations — blessing north, south, east and west.

Fourfold blessing for the Feast of Corpus Christi

We bless our neighborhood,  city, country and world in the north, south, east and west. May the Eucharist be a sign of God’s loving presence for all people.

We pray for the blessings of every season — for a renewing summer, a fruitful springtime, a gentle winter, an inspiring autumn. May we grow in peace, vision and holiness.

God and Lover of all, bless all our relationships. Bring us harmony and joy i the name of Father, Son and Spirit. Amen.

WEEK OF JUNE 16, 2019

Response to each petition: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For the church. May we seek to understand and proclaim the length, the breadth and the depth of your love. Empower us to be faithful disciples of Jesus.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For our world. Help us appreciate and delight in the gift of nature. May we behold your handiwork and exert energy to conserve creation’s beauty for our children and their children.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For the entire human family. Kindle within us a desire for truth. Help us renew our relationships and strengthen our commitment to justice.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For our fathers, grandfathers, stepfathers and godfathers. Bless and strengthen them to be guide for our lives and for our souls. May they be models of holiness and truth.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • Heal the sick and the grieving. Comfort the dying. Sustain those who suffer through hunger, poverty or need. Bring peace to those who are alienated and alone. Open our hearts to immigrants and refugees.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

  • For the intentions we make in silence … We remember our deceased fathers and grandfathers.

We ask: Receive our prayer, O God.

Call to worship

Everything is given to us from God our creator, through Jesus Christ our savior, and in the Holy Spirit our helper. On this Feast of Trinity Sunday we celebrate the fullness of life and love that we have in God.

  • To the point: The Spirit guides us to all truth. Such a bold statement. That truth is the Holy Spirit — the life given by the Spirit. Everything the Father has is given to us. An even bolder statement. What the Father gives us is divine life. And it is for Jesus’ glory that his disciples are empowered by the Spirit to bear what belongs to Jesus and the Father: divine Life. Our triune God holds back nothing from us.
  • Connecting the Gospel (John 16: 12-15) to the second reading: Since we have received everything that is of God, the Trinity’s divine life is within us (see Gospel). This life “poured … into our hearts” empowers us to be justified and even to “boast of our afflictions” (second reading).
  • To experience: Our age has an inherent optimism about unraveling the mysteries of life, whether it be the origins of the universe or the genetic makeup of a person. If there’s a mystery, “We’ll solve it.” This solemnity presents the Trinity as a mystery not to be “solved” or “explained,” but as a Trinity of Persons who share their very life with us.

WEEK OF JUNE 9, 2019

Response to each petition: Come to us, Spirit of God.

  • For the whole church. Fill us with the fruits of your Spirit that we may receive and offer your love, your joy and your peace in every situation.

We ask: Come to us, Spirit of God.

  • For all who are burdened by grief or despair. Bring hope to their hearts and new vision to their lives.

We ask: Come to us, Spirit of God.

  • Help us end divisions in our world. Show us ways to find common ground that we may promote healing and reconciliation.

We ask: Come to us, Spirit of God.

  • For all who experience injustice, heal their pain and inspire them to trust again.

We ask: Come to us, Spirit of God.

  • In thanksgiving for your many gifts, and for the needs of the poor, the sick, the dying and the grieving, which we hold in our hearts.

We ask: Come to us, Spirit of God.

Call to worship

Today we celebrate the great feast of Pentecost. When the gift of the Spirit given to the apostles, they were empowered to recreate the world with energy, discernment and love. We are given the same gift and call today.

  • To the point: “If you love me.” “Whoever loves me.” Our love always is a free choice and, as human beings, we never are quite sure of our choices. God’s love, on the other hand, is sure and steady. God continually sends the Spirit to dwell within us. This indwelling Spirit empowers us to love with God’s steadfastness. Transformed by the Spirit, our love moves from “if” to “I can, I choose, I will.”
  • Connecting the Gospel (John 20-19-23) to the first reading: St. Paul enumerates the effects of the Spirit’s dwelling within us: we belong to Christ, are made righteous, are given new life, become adopted children and heirs of God. Here is God’s gift of Love to us: an unprecedented relationship made possible by the indwelling of the Holy Spirit.
  • To our experience: It is so much easier to act with love when we know we are loved. We can act with love in all times and places, all situations and circumstances, because we know we are filled with the Spirit who is God’s love.
Pentecost fire lighting prayer

Today we remember Mary and the apostles who gathered in the upper room afraid, prayerful and waiting, hoping to find direction for their lives. God’s Spirit of Peace empowered them with tongues of fire over their heads, enlightening their hearts, kindling their spirits, calming their fear.

God’s Spirit touched them with enthusiasm, energy and boundless abilities, God’s Spirit filled their hearts with burning desire and kindled in them a vibrant joy and a deep peace.

In this fire, O God, may we know the presence of your Spirit among us, a Spirit who breaks through our suffering, opens our hearts and enlightens our vision.

WEEK OF JUNE 2, 2019

Response to each petition: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For unity with Christians and with all world religions. May all strive to be one in love, one in truth, and one in compassion.

We pray: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For healing within the human family. May men and women, adults and children, young and old, rich and poor, powerful and powerless, celebrate our common humanity with joy.

We pray: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For a deeper perspective and vision. May we understand God’s call in our lives and surrender ourselves to God’s will. May we gratefully and generously respond to all that God asks of us.

We pray: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For all who suffer through illness and unbearable grief, for the addicted and all who feel powerless to help themselves. For those who face insurmountable problems, or immfigrants and refugees who seek welcome and a home. Grant them peace, and hold them in love;

We pray: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For the intentions we hold in our hearts …

We pray: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

Call to worship

The scriptures remind us that our love and our unity bind us to God, strengthen our mission and witness to God’s great glory.

  • To the point: Jesus prays that the intimate love and union he shares with his Father may take root in his disciples. Experiencing such divine love and intimate union enables and sustains the disciples who are to take up Jesus’ mission to the world. In fact, love and unity among believers is their primary mission, their first witness to the glory of the risen presence of Christ. We even see Stephen dying in God’s glory.
  • Connecting the Gospel  (John 17: 20-26) to the second reading: John’s vision is of the fulfillment of time when Jesus returns to gather the faithful to share his eternal glory. When we disciples embrace the love and unity for which Jesus prays in the Gospel, we are responding to Jesus’ invitation to “come.”
  • To experience: Too often, the notion of love portrayed in our society does not bring unity but disharmony because the love is selfish. Unselfish love is about care for the other, and this care strengthens relationships and is tangible in the unity of minds and hearts.

WEEK OF MAY 26, 2019

Response to each petition: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For the church. Make us attentive to the creative work of the Spirit. Inspire us to find new ways to nourish faith and to remove unnecessary obstacles that hinder faith-

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For all people. May we know God’s presence that surrounds us, the peace and comfort of the Spirit within us and the strength of Christ that encourages and supports us.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For the many promises held by the month of May. For college students facing graduations’ new directions. For couples preparing for marriage. For deacons and priests who will be ordained. For those expecting children to be born. May they have God’s blessings.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • Bring peace to all who are troubled, particularly to the hungry and the homeless; to victims of crime, terrorism and natural disasters; to the homebound, the sick and dying; to the addicted and to all who grieve.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For the intentions we hold in silence …

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

Call to worship

During these final weeks of the Easter season, the church invites us to reflect upon God’s gift of the Holy Spirit , who brings us peace, who strengthens our faith and who binds us together in divine love.

  • To the point: Jesus promises to send us the Holy Spirit, who will “teach us everything.” The Holy Spirit does not teach us what to believe but to believe. To believe means to live out of the divine indwelling, live out of the peace given, live out of the mutual exchange of love between God and us. Believing is living what the Spirit teaches us.
  • Connecting the Gospel (John 14:23-29) to the second reading: The second reading describes the heavenly Jerusalem that “gleam(s) with the splendor of God … and the Lamb.” The divine indwelling in us and our believing make us citizens of this city.
  • To experience: Gifts most often are tangible, and the most prized ones satisfy our wants and desires. Jesus offers us a gift beyond anything we can imagine or desire — his risen presence as the Holy Spirit dwelling within us. This gift satisfies beyond all human expectations.

WEEK OF MAY 19, 2019

Response to each petition: Risen Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For the church. Show us how to be more gentle and loving. Help us grow in compassion and forgiveness. May we recognize your love and goodness in every part of our world, in every person.

We ask: Risen Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For the world. Heal the abused and the addicted. Help those who struggle with daily burdens. Relieve the sufferings of the sick, the poor and the hungry.

We ask: Risen Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For freedom of mind and heart. Inspire us to refashion our broken relationships to enter new forms of service, to welcome new visions for our lives, to love those who we have judged negatively.

We ask: Risen Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For peace. Help us to recognize the value of each person, to cherish the treasure of our loving relationships, to understand that your love is always bringing us closer together in divine glory.

We ask: Risen Lord, receive our prayer.

  • For our personal needs that we hold in silence …

We ask: Risen Lord, receive our prayer.

Call to worship

The Easter season calls us to understand the new creation — the mutual union of God’s love and human love — a force that becomes more real every day. Loving is the only way to show God’s glory.

  • To the point: Jesus’ new commandment is, “As I have loved you, so you also should love one another.” The nature of our love as disciples is specific, singular and incomparable. We are to love to the extent and in the manner Jesus loved. Our love is to be the self-sacrificing love of Jesus. It is this kind of love that brings Jesus glory. It is this kind of love that brings God glory. It is this kind of love that enables us to share in that same glory.
  • Connecting the gospel  (John 13: 31-35) to the second reading: When we live Jesus’ new commandment of love, the results are dramatic: “A new heaven and a new earth,” “new Jerusalem,” indeed, “all things new.” This is the reality we must believe we are becoming every day of our lives.
  • To experience: We are keen on underscoring obligation — we must “love one another.” This is only possible because of the power and grace that come from our first being loved by God.

WEEK OF MAY 12, 2019

Response to each petition: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For the Church. May we recognize your voice as our Shepherd. Help us to wipe away the tears of all who suffer, especially those who have been victimized by the church.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • Ease the worries and the burdens our world carries. Open our hearts and minds to envision and support better ways of living, to practice thoughtfulness and compassion, and to work together for the common good.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • Let us pray for peace in our world. For calmness where there is division, mistrust and violence. May we work together so that all people may find happiness.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For our own pastor and shepherd Father Jim, and for all who minister in our faith community. May their compassionate and welcoming service be a sign to all of your generous love.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For all mothers, stepmothers, grandmothers and godmothers. May God bless them abundantly. May their continued love influence our lives and our relationships.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For our beloved sick, dying, and grieving. We especially remember our mothers who have died and any intentions that we hold in our silence.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

Call to worship

Today we proclaim and celebrate that we are a part of God’s flock ready to hear God’s voice and ready to follow on the pathways where God leads us.

  • To the point: Our being “sheep” does not mean that we blindly follow Jesus but that we actively pursue a relationship with him by hearing his voice and heeding his words. Though following the Good Shepherd truly leads to eternal life, the way of discipleship is not easy. Yet, nothing can interfere with Jesus’ care for us: we are secure in his hands — never alone with the Good Shepherd.
  • Connecting the Gospel (John 10: 27-30) to the first reading: Jesus is the Good Shepherd (gospel) and the Lamb who was slain (second reading). As shepherd, Jesus is the one who cares for us and leads us even when we face jealousy, abuse and rejection (first reading). As lamb, Jesus is the one who lays down his life in sacrifice for us.
  • To experience: The tumult of the world is not a sign that God has abandoned us. Jealousy, violent abuse, persecution, expulsions, etc., always have been part of our human condition. In all of this, Jesus shepherds us, lead us to “springs of life-giving water” and “wipes away every tear” (second reading).

WEEK OF MAY 5, 2019

Response to each petition: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For the church. Broaden our vision. Help us find new ways to love all people through genuine forgiveness and hospitality.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For the world and its leaders. Make them unafraid to honestly confront the challenges of inequality, racism and violence

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • Inspire Pope Francis and all church leaders and ministers. Help them make decisions that uphold the dignity of our human family.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For all gathered at worship. Nourish the hungers of our hearts. Open us to the needs of immigrants and strangers.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For peace on our planet and for a flourishing of love in our homes and workplaces.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For those who are suffering — the sick, the addicted, the dying and the grieving. And for our personal needs.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

Call to worship

Easter calls us to remain faithful to Christ who constantly nourishes us, who continually believes in us, who always calls us to recognize God’s gifts within us and who brings us new life.

  • To the point: The gospel hints at two failures: the fishermen coming back with no fish and Peter’s denial of Jesus before his death. Yet these failures became occasions for Jesus’ gift of abundance: a large catch of fish and a fuller love that would “glorify God.” Faithful discipleship is not measured by absence of failure but by openness to obeying new commands from Jesus, recognition of God’s abundant gifts and willingness to grow into new life. Today, we celebrate Easter openness and abundance.
  • Connecting the Gospel (John 21:1-19) to the first reading: Strict orders from the Sanhedrin did not deter the disciples from obeying “God rather than men.” Faithful to Jesus’ command to follow him, they even rejoiced that they were able to “suffer dishonor for the sake of the name.”
  • To experience: Sometimes we can be so discouraged by our failure to follow Jesus faithfully that we tend to give up trying. Remembering that Jesus never gives up on us can instill in us the courage to stay the course of discipleship.
Penitential Rite

Kyrie Eleison / Christe Eleison/ Kyrie Eleison

You continue to love and empower us, even when we deny you or distrust our faith. When we are humbled and recognize our shortcomings, we are most ready to receive your grace. Bring us together, Lord in our humanity, and show us the great power of forgiving others.

WEEK OF APRIL 28, 2019

Response to each petition: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For the Church. May we reveal the power of resurrection and new life in every part of our global society, especially to those who have lost hope.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For the gift of peace. May nations and people know the power of forgiveness that there may be a lasting peace in every part of our world.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For the grace of healing. May our wounds of body, mind and spirit enable us to become instruments of new life and hope to others.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For a blossoming of hope. May our world be flooded with faith. May we not trust the illusions and false promises of secular society but rather bring all people to a deeper awareness of God’s love.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For those who question their faith or who have left the church or hurt by her. May our constant witness lead them to a deeper understanding of God’s abiding presence.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

  • For our own intentions. For our sick, dying and grieving; and for those needs we hold in silence.

We ask: Risen Lord, hear our prayer.

Call to Worship

The Easter Message is filled with peace, joy and forgiveness for all, especially those who have difficulty with faith.We are called to bring others to a deeper experience of Jesus’ peace.

  • To the point: Three times in the gospel, the risen Lord addresses the gathered disciples with “Peace be with you.” This peace he brings allays fears, empowers forgiveness and prompts us to accept the reality of suffering and death as doorways to new life. This peace is new life: the Spirit breathed into us by the risen Lord with Jesus. Though we sin, Jesus only wishes new life for us.
  • Connecting the Gospel (John 20:19-31) to the first reading: The risen Lord “holds the keys to death.” He unlocks the doors to new life not only for himself who is “alive for ever and ever,” but also for us. We who believe in him as the gospel bids do not live in fear but in the peace his risen life brings.
  • To experience: The “signs and wonders” that reveal the presence of the risen Christ stretch far beyond miraculous healings. People see the risen Christ also in our everyday acts of kindness, sensitivity, generosity, patience and forgiveness.

WEEK OF APRIL 14, 2019

Response to each petition: Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

  • Inspire Pope Francis and the entire Church. Give us renewed vision and strong direction. May Holy Week all over the world be a sacred and vibrant expression of our common faith.

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

  • Give us the courage to empty ourselves, to gratefully surrender our lives into God’s hands, to give up our anxieties and worries and to embrace our suffering with understanding

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer

  • For all who carry the crosses of life. For all who are hungry, poor or suffering. For all who are unemployed or experience stress. For all who are persecuted, unjustly accused, abused, forgotten, sick or addicted.

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer

  • Guide governments and people of every nation to welcome immigrants, reject violence and resolve conflict peacefully. May we find the best ways to foster reconciliation and healing.

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer

  • For peace in the world and an end to violence, particularly in the Holy Land and throughout the Middle East. May the sacred events we recall this week inspire our world and fill us with hope in new life.

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer

  • For the prayers we hold in silence.

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer

Call to worship
  • To the point: Luke’s Passion account highlights how much Jesus loved life. His struggle to say yes to his Father’s will (“take this cup away from me”) was so intense that he sweats blood. He also intensely loved others and their lives: he healed the man with the severed ear, comforted the women of Jerusalem, forgave his executioners, promised paradise to the repentant thief. For the sake of others’ life he was willing to give over his own life (“not my will but yours be done.”) Jesus’ struggle and self-giving is to be ours. While intensely loving the life given us, we also are to give it over for others.
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 22/23: 14-49) to the first reading: Isaiah’s prophecy finds its fulfillment in Jesus. It not only describes his suffering but also his concern for others, “speaking to the weary a word of comfort.”
  • To experience: When we hear the proclamation of the Passion, we are most mindful of all the suffering Jesus endured. Luke reminds us that the passion also proclaims Jesus’ ultimate self-giving ministry for others.

WEEK OF APRIL 7, 2019

Third Scrutiny: Deliverance from cosmic, universal evil

God is power God is might. God will triumph over sin.

Kyrie Eleison … Christe Eleison … Kyrie Eleison.

  • When the dignity of humanity is threatened or destroyed; when the thirst for power drives government and politics,; when people are victimized by discrimination, deceit or neglect.

Deliver us O God – Kyrie Eleison

  • Wherever we are indifferent to the cries of the poor and the needy; wherever people are threatened by political oppression; wherever addiction and suicide result from our depression; wherever the innocent are victimized by war.

Deliver us O God – Christe Eleison.

  • Where prisoners are tortured and humiliated; where people are not free to practice faith; where the spirit of the powerless is stifled and crushed.

Deliver us O God – Kyrie Eleison.

  • From the ungrateful depletion of our atmosphere; from our failure to save energy and resources for future generations; from our exploitation of natural wonders given freely by God.

Deliver us O God – Christe Eleison.

  • That peace and love may reign in our world; that justice and dignity may prevail in our time; that all creation may live in unity and harmony.

Deliver us O God – Kyrie Eleison.

God is power, God is might – Christe Eleison

God will triumph over sin – Kyrie Eleison

Prayer of Exorcism

We lift before you O God, our brothers and sisters preparing for the Easter sacraments and this entire assembly who seek renewal in our faith. May the power of your word change our lives and invigorate our spirit. Free us from any falsehood and evil, and create in all of us a clean heart, a renewed vision, a deepened sense of your indwelling holiness. We ask you this through Jesus, your son and our Lord. Amen.

Laying on of hands

Lord Jesus, in your gentle strength set free our spirit, touch our minds and our hearts, awaken our sense of mission. Guide these chosen people in the journey of our lives. May they be signs to the world of the greatness and power of your unconditional love. Amen

Call to Worship

During this last week of Lent, we recognize how God is doing something new within us. As Christ touches the woman caught in adultery, so also does he touch us with generous and nonjudgmental love.

  • To the point: The scribes and Pharisees brought an adulterous woman to Jesus and made her stand in the middle. In their self-righteousness they wished to make an example of her as a grave sinner deserving of death. Ironically, Jesus makes an example of them as sinners: they turned away from him and “went away one by one.” The woman, however, remained with Jesus. Our own work during Lent is like that of the adulterous woman: truthfully face our sinfulness and faithfully remain with Jesus. Though we sin, Jesus only wishes new life for us.
  • Connecting the Gospel (John 8:1-11) to the second reading: Paul admonishes us not to be prisoners of our sinfulness but to strain forward to the new life that lies ahead. This new life is the “supreme good of knowing Christ Jesus” and remaining with him (“be found in him.”)
  • To experience: When we focus exclusively on our own sinfulness we can easily lose sight of our goodness and God’s mercy. Jesus responds even to profound sin with even more profound mercy.

WEEK OF MARCH 31, 2019

Second Scrutiny: Deliverance from institutional evil

God is power God is might. God will triumph over sin.

Kyrie Eleison … Christe Eleison … Kyrie Eleison.

  • When we disregard the rights of children and their education. When we refuse to help the poor, the hungry & the homeless When we degrade others because of sex, race, lifestyle or social class.

Deliver us O God – Kyrie Eleison.

  • When we ignore the wisdom and dignity of the elderly.  When we refuse medical care or insurance to the needy.  When we silence our prophets and our visionaries.

Deliver us O God – Christe Eleison.

  • From the prostitution of people and principles. From the enslavement and domestic abuse of children and adults. From injustice in the church and in enterprise. From violence in our homes, on our streets and in our schools.

Deliver us O God – Kyrie Eleison.

  • From the power of false news, propaganda and pornography.  From mismanagement and greed in enterprise and industry. From corruption and the abuse of time in our political systems.

Deliver us O God – Christe Eleison.

  • From mistreatment in prisons, old-age homes and institutions for the marginalized. From the cult of Satan and the exaltation of evil. From our refusal to grow in our faith. From our denial of the holiness of others.

Deliver us O God – Kyrie Eleison.

God is power, God is might – Christe Eleison.

God will triumph over sin – Kyrie Eleison.

Prayer of Exorcism

We lift before you O God, those preparing for the sacraments, and this assembly who seeks a renewal in faith. May the power of your word change our lives and invigorate our spirit. Free us from any falsehood and evil. Create in us a clean heart, a renewed vision, a deeper sense of your indwelling holiness.

Laying on of hands

Lord Jesus, in your gentle strength set free our spirit, touch our minds and our hearts, awaken our sense of mission. Guide your chosen people through life’s journey.  May we be signs to the world of the great power of your unconditional love. Amen.

Call to Worship

As the loving father welcomes back the son who has squandered his inheritance, so, too, does God generously welcome us home — no matter who we are, or what we have done.

  • To the point: This familiar parable often is referred to as the parable of the prodigal (wasteful) son. On one hand, the younger son is prodigal when he prodigiously squanders his inheritance. On the other hand, the real prodigality of the son lay in that he loved his life enough to swallow his pride, return home and throw himself on the mercy of his father. The father, too, is prodigal: he welcomes him as son, clothes him in the finest array, and throws a lavish feast. He gave him new life. This is the most prodigal act possible: to give new life.
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 15; 1-3, 11-32) to the second reading: Paul reinforces what the gospel parable points to — sureness in the Father’s prodigiousness — “new things have come.” As the younger son is reconciled with his father, we are all reconciled to God through Christ.
  • To experience: Good parents spare nothing for their children’s sake — sometimes even being prodigious beyond their means. How much more so is our loving Father prodigious with us!

WEEK OF MARCH 24, 2019

First Scrutiny

On the third, fourth and fifth Sundays of Lent, the church encourages all people and especially those who are to come into full communion in our faith at Easter to ask for freedom from all evil. On the third week of Lent, we pray for deliverance from personal evil:

  • When we fail to seek and proclaim you, when greed and selfishness divide us, when hatred and fear enslave us.

Deliver us O God – Kyrie Eleison.

  • Wherever we ignore the needs of others, wherever we have built walls of division, wherever we have shown arrogance or prejudice.

Deliver us O God – Christe Eleison.

  • From the lure of wealth, power and glory, from our desires to manipulate and exploit, from our need to stay in control,

Deliver us Deliver us O God – Kyrie Eleison.

  • When we desire to hold revenge, when we hesitate to forgive, when we injure by our words and gossip

Deliver us O God – Christe Eleison.

  • From our impatience, anger and deceit. From our mistrust, conceit and pride. From our addictions, self-pity and envy,

Deliver us Deliver us O God – Kyrie Eleison.

Deliver us Deliver us O God – Kyrie Eleison.

God is power, God is might – Christe Eleison

God will triumph over sin – Kyrie Eleison

Prayer of Exorcism

We lift before you O God, those preparing for the Easter sacraments and this assembly who seeks a renewal in faith. May the power of your word change our lives and invigorate our spirit. Free us from any falsehood and evil. Create in us a clean heart, a renewed vision, a deeper sense of your indwelling holiness.

Lord Jesus, in your gentle strength set free our spirit, ttouch our minds and our hearts, awaken our sense of mission. Guide your chosen people through life’s journey. May we be signs to the world of the great power of your unconditional love. Amen

Call to Worship

Lent is all about redirecting our lives. The fig tree that bears no fruit gets added nourishment and a second chance to bear fruit. The same is true for each of us.

We must redirect our lives to be life-giving.

  • To the point: The owner of the fig tree only cares about whether the tree bears fruit — he has no regard for the tree and its life. The gardener, on the other hand, cares about the fig tree, sees the life still there and wants to give it every chance (“I shall cultivate … and fertilize it”) to produce. He knows that as long as there’s life, there’s potential to bear fruit. What wastes away life within us and prevents us from bearing fruit is sin. Repentance, then, means choosing to nurture new life and all the fullness it can bring.
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 13: 1-9) to the second reading: Paul, like Jesus, offers examples from Israel’s history as a “warning to us” not to stray from God’s guidance. God offered every means for coming to new life to the people of Israel — including the burning bush through which Moses heard God’s words of compassion. So, too, Jesus offers us every means for coming to new and fruitful life (“I shall cultivate the ground … and fertilize it.”)
  • To experience: Growing up takes hard work. Getting ahead in life takes hard work. Deepening our relationship with God and others takes hard work. It is no surprise, then, that repenting takes hard work. The discipline of Lent includes this kind of “hard work repentance” which leads to the new life Easter promises.

WEEK OF MARCH 17, 2019

Response to each petition: Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

  • For the Church. Enlighten us with your Spirit in these times of chaos and confusion. Help us to be vessels of holiness.

We ask. Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

  • For our world. May the homeless find shelter and welcome. May those who have lost hope find fulfillment. May we acknowledge everyone as a holy child of God and end so much separation, prejudice, violence and killing.

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

  • For those who live under clouds of fear; who suffer from depression or mental illness’ who live in unsafe communities; who do not believe in God.

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

  • For the blessings of Lent. Inspire those who prepare for sacraments and bless all who are on a spiritual journey.

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

  • Bring peace to the human family. Guide us to find ways to end hunger, terrorism and war.

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

  • For our personal needs. For our beloved sick and dying. For all who grieve, and for the prayers we hold in our silence.

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

Call to worship

In today’s Gospel, the disciples experience Jesus in his full glory. They are transformed by his holiness. We also can be changed during this Lent when we allow ourselves to be overshadowed by God’s presence.
To the point: During prayer Jesus’ “face changed.” This phrase is biblical language indicating that Jesus himself changed. The transfiguration is a fleeting glimpse of the glory of his risen life. To come to this glory, however, Jesus could not remain on the mountain but had to continue his journey to Jerusalem and the cross. During prayer we, too, encounter God in such a way that we are invited to change. We, too, are emboldened to follow our life journey and embrace the cross. And we, too, will be glorified now and forever.

  • Connecting the Gospel  (Luke 9:28b-36) to the second reading: On the mountain of transfiguration the disciples witnessed the glory of Jesus’ identity as the “chosen Son.” We, too, are destined for glory when Christ will “change our lowly body to conform with his glorified body” (second reading).
  • To experience: We often have glimpses of glory: in a remarkable sunset, in the shining face of a delighted child, in the radiant joy of new parents. Like the transfiguration, these glimpses of glory encourage and strengthen us to continue the journey of life toward eternal glory. Even the very old Abraham was asked to count the stars.

WEEK OF MARCH 10, 2019

Response to each petition: Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

  • For the universal church and for Pope Francis. May this time of Lent bring clarity and healing to those suffer or who have left us because of our sin.

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

  • May governments all over the world offer safety to those fleeing danger and oppression. We pray for policies and borders that welcome the stranger.

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

  • For all who are incarcerated. For those imprisoned by addictions to drugs, alcohol, gambling, technology or pornography. We pray for adequate funding and for skilled treatment, and that these victims may be healed.

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

  • For us as we begin this Lenten journey. For strength to overcome temptations. That hurt our relationship with God. For reconciliation in our broken relationships and for a strengthening of the faith that supports us.

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

  • For all who are sick, dying or grieving. For people who are alone and need support and love. For a deeper care and understanding toward all who are living.
  • For the intentions we hold in silence …

We ask: Lord, hear your people’s prayer.

Call to worship

This is the time of fulfillment. We begin the holy season of Lent facing human temptations with the support of our faith and the love of God ready to change our lives for the better.

  • To the point — Twice the devil entices Jesus to give into temptation by saying, “If you are the Son of God …” Jesus is divine, but he also is fully human. Jesus resists the devil’s temptation to put aside his humanity and act like God, thus remaining true to himself and to why he came. But Jesus’ resisting the temptations has implications for us, too. By fully embracing his humanity Jesus lifts us up to be who we are in our relationship with God. Only from this relationship do we have the inner strength and conviction to make right choices in face of the temptations that are an inevitable part of being human.
  • Connecting the Gospel (Luke 4: 1-13) to the second reading — In the Gospel the devil sets himself up as Lord when he tempts Jesus to worship him. Paul reminds us in the second reading that Jesus is the One whom we are to profess.
  • To our experience — All temptation presents us with a choice in the face of a perceived good. We are able to see through the ruse of the perceived good to the inherent selfishness of all temptation when we spend our lives deepening our sense of who we are in relation to God.